How You Say...

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Cenedra

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How You Say...
« Reply #60 on: December 03, 2004, 01:11:08 PM »

Here we don't have so many schools as America, only three main ones.

There's Kindergarten, and that's optional, but it's usually from when you're 3-5 yrs old.

Next: Primary school, which goes from Prepatory (it's what the grade before grade 1 is called for some reason, don't ask me why) to grade 6, usually ages 6-12. This is in my state anyway, in some other states Primary school goes up to year 7 and highschool starts in year 8.

Highschool- Starts at year 7 in my state and goes to year 12. Usually ages 13-18 yrs old.

Highschool here is compulsory until Year 10...

After that a multitude of tertiary options! Including University, apprenticeships, private institutes, TAFE etc.

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Syrion

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How You Say...
« Reply #61 on: December 03, 2004, 08:40:41 PM »

In the Netherlands it's different, they do have some similarities, but it's based on general intelligence/wisdom of the student.

You start with 'Basic School' (basisschool) where you get the basics, from about 6 untill 12 year old). In the last class of this school (sixth grade) you'll get some kind of national tests, and based on those tests your future 'school career' you'll get an advice what to do next.

Code: [Select]
                                        basisschool
                     .---------------------|---------------------,
                 vmbo/mavo                havo                  vwo
                     |                     |                     |
                    mbo--------->---------hbo------->--------university

I won't bore you with the official (long) names of these type of schools.

VMBO basicly is labour-oriented education and lower general education (like simple office-jobs), takes 4 years

HAVO is higher general education, takes 5 years

VWO is the highest general education (dead languages as latin & greek are only available at this form). The 'W' in it refers to 'wetenschappen' (sciences), but it's not aimed that much on sciences, takes 6 years

MBO (prerequisites: VMBO/or (at least) 3rd grade in HAVO) are labour-oriented education, where the VMBO was the basics, here you learn the techniques used for your (labour) profession (jobs of this level: carpenters,  mechanics, welders, secretaries, etc.)

HBO (prerequisites: HAVO or VWO), this is what the Dutch call 'highschool', young adults are being trained in advanced jobs like management, etc. (the international titles of "bachelor" and "master" can be done here)

University: needs no introduction, I guess...

<rant>

My school-carreer: left basic school with VWO-advice, but after the combined years of HAVO/VWO (almost the same), I went to HAVO, because of my laziness and hatred of homework (which I barely did, if I did 15% of all homework in my entire 'school career' that's probably much). Due to the same reasons I faced at the end of the year thereafter the choise: do 3rd grade of HAVO again, or do the final year of MAVO. My parents ordered me to do the MAVO. Basicly I did nothing that year but hating it, learned nothing for the final exam, passed it with a B on everything and went back to HAVO. Finished that as well (also B's while doing nothing). And tried an HBO-course on "interaction design".  It took me a year to find out it didn't bother me at all (too much management-crap, I hate management), so dropped out. Tried to get on some arts academies (also HBO-level), but didn't get past the selections (damn!), so I started working. Then I tried to do another 'creative information technology' HBO-course in Amsterdam, to find out it was almost exactly the same garbage as attempt one in the Hague (their thoughts on 'creative' was: thinking of IT-solutions for businesses, not exactly my view on creativity). so that was quit after 6 months.

Now I'm having an unschooled job, frustrated with how overrated education is and why I can't get a job with my hobbies (which means: over a decade of experience), only because I don't have any papers/diploma's/bulls.

</rant>
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Poper

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How You Say...
« Reply #62 on: December 04, 2004, 02:35:07 AM »

Although the schooling systems may be different Syrion, I know EXACTLY how you feel and where you are, I'm in the same situation. I can't get a decent job to suit my interests because I don't have the stupid piece of paper that says I know how to do the things that *I* know I could do in my sleep.
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Cenedra

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« Reply #63 on: December 04, 2004, 07:06:27 AM »

Your school system sounds whacked Syrion. They already start dividing people based on intelligence/ability when they're 12 years old? :elfgirl_huh: One would think some kid's cognitive development would not be fully finished by then. Everyone grows at different rates. Here in our schools everyone goes in the same stream, it's just very broad and you can choose what path you make yourself by what sort of subjects you choose. They don't make you start making decisions about your future until you're at least 16 years old (year 10) where you can start choosing your tertiary education (or none, if you so desire). But I didn't totally make up my mind about what I wanted to do until I got into year 12. I just knew I didn't want to go into the science/math/IT field. And even then it's more about what subjects you choose and how hard you work rather than your personal intelligence.

Although I hate homework and know that education and schooling has absolutely no relevance to the real world and real jobs (Like, would a real job make you do exams every six weeks?) I think the Australian system isn't too bad. There are lots of second chances and alternative options for people who don't want to do the whole university thing, or work slower than other people or have a second life that makes them more busy (such as music or dancing). For example, I have a few friends that are doing year 12 across two years, called part-time, because of other co-curricular commitments. And although it is true that going to University leaves more job options open for a person, there's a great influx of people who go do apprenticeships or TAFEs instead and end up getting good jobs. The only thing it requires is working. Unfortunately, as Poper said, you do need some sort of qualification to get a job, so you can't just say "I know how to do it dammit!" you have to get proof.

The only thing I really hate about our education system is the structure. What I really didn't like was the monotonous routine (HATE ROUTINE. I don't regret finishing school at all. I'll miss my friends but that's about it) and the fact that when you're rated for your ENTER, they rate you against all other students in the state rather than just for yourself. It helps universities pick out who's the best, but it means that even if you did well, if there's a thousand people who did slightly better than you, you'd end up with a D+ rather than the A you deserved.
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Edhelur

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« Reply #64 on: December 05, 2004, 04:37:53 AM »

If they separated people by intelligence at twelve, they'd separate out a pretty big majority.... *winces* That's the year almost everyone (not including me) spends stoned, high AND drunk.

I should have mentioned... In every grade after elementary school, there's advanced class options. Self explanatory, really, but allows the non-stoners a place to congregate.
Oh yes, and in the Sophomore year (what the Aussies would call Year 10, I think) and up, you can take AP classes, (Advanced Placement) so instead of just Honors level, which are for the smart kids who actually *try*-- they go faster, cover more, have more work-- instead of Honors, AP is college level. Which means you can get college credits, without paying any sort of tuition. Which is a very good thing that I fully intend to do.

BTW. Credits (a concept I'm still trying to get my head around, however simple) are, well, credit for showing up. If you pass the class (D or above), you get however many credits it's worth. Usually each class is worth between 4 and 10 credits. You need a certain number of credits to graduate after Senior year (18 years old... Year 12, right?)-- depends on the school how many. My school requires 220 by the end, with 100 made in the first two years. Sounds quite impossible, but figuring it, it is possible... barely. Seven classes a day, an hour each, five credits per semester from each... if you take all seven hours, you can get, like, seventy in the first year *calculates*....
And for every four classes you skive... *evil grin* a credit gets taken off that class, and you have to make it up with 18 hours of tutoring...

Which cracks me up cuz I know at least four kids who *never* go to class, and they are SOOOO screwed. I'm evil, I know.
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Darkon

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How You Say...
« Reply #65 on: December 05, 2004, 11:01:59 AM »

VWO is separated in Atheneum and Gymnasium, the last having greek and latin and is considered more difficult. Although that was last time I checked. Since the introduction of 2nd phase Gymnasium education became laughable easier than it used to be. A shame though. I'd like to know my languages a bit better, but alas.

As Syrion said, if you want a good job, you have to start for yourself or you must have done VWO, HBO or University. People want to see some certificates and diploma's and VMBO doesn't bring you far, but that doesn't mean you can still get a pretty cool job. It happens, just not often.

Dutch system separates 'early', but the test isn't everything. Teacher's advice is (more) important (as well) since the test is a recording of one moment. While a teacher who has spend the last two years teaching the kids, knows how intelligent they are or not. Even if you can't study well the system allows you acces to higher levels of education. It will take you more years but if you want it, you can get there. I know of one medical student who was dumped at VBO (Mavo and vbo became vmbo, but that experiment kinda failed. Not sure what they did with IVBO (lowest you can go :S)) and then worked her way up to university. Same years as me, but 5 years older and I know another girl who did HAVO first and then VWO, followed by university. And there are many examples of people moving the other way. VWO-> HAVO etc.

The system ain't that bad, but if you want something you have to study to get there. The only thing that's horrible about it is government doing experiments or launching strange ideas in the hopes of improving the system. :elf_gloop:

/end off-Topic

For more 'How you say' I suggest reading 'Haagse Harry'.  :jester:
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The Wolf

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How You Say...
« Reply #66 on: December 05, 2004, 03:38:53 PM »

In the USA, there are more school systems for elementary and high school than you could imagine. All though are based on kindergarten through year 12 of education. Normally age 5 through 18. After high scholl technical college (trade school), college or university.  :smile:
« Last Edit: December 05, 2004, 03:39:12 PM by The Wolf »
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The Squire Of Forest Deep

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« Reply #67 on: August 29, 2006, 09:41:54 AM »

I was surprised recently when an American exchange student didn't know what 'slack' meant. In Australia, it basically means either you're lazy, or you're mean.

eg.

Dude1: That kid is ugly and fat and I dislike him
Dude2: Woah, that was slack!

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Kikori

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Re: How You Say...
« Reply #68 on: December 21, 2012, 12:02:47 PM »

Hahaha. I obvoiusly never saw this thread, but there's some hilarious shit on here. Aussie slang is the best.  Thought I'd share a few for the f**king sake of it, mate.

Actually, as I am writing this, one of the ladies at work has just called me "Diddums" for having a whinge about being at work.

"Diddums" isn't specifically Australian I don't think, but lots of "old birds" (which is slang for older ladies or "Sheilas") use it, mostly sarcastically, for people "having a sook" (which is slang for whinging or complaining).

She also referred to me as "sooky-lala", which is basically "cry baby".

There's also things like "Harold Holt", which is slang for salt. (Holt being a former PM of the great OZ). In the same vain we have "dead horse" (tomato sauce).

Besides "durries", cigarettes are also called "darts", "burners", "fag" (which is more Brit that Aussie) "ciggos", of course, and "tar sticks".

Might be just Tassie, but a fair few call the newspaper "the black and white".

There's also slangs you use in specific scenarios, like "capper", which you can use when you think you've done something spectacular "or spekky". Named after Wawrick Capper, it's usually used in Aussie Rules footy when someone takes a big mark, which we also refer to as "spekkies" or "screamers". There's heaps for Footy, but I wouldn't wanna bore you with it.

Cordie, which is short for cordial.

Anyway. I came into this about 8 years too late so I guess I "missed the boat".
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James

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Re: How You Say...
« Reply #69 on: December 21, 2012, 05:21:44 PM »

Much as I hate to correct a statement made eight years ago, calling soda "coke" is not a Southern States thing. It may be a Georgia thing, since that is where it is primarily located, but I have lived in two southern states and traveled through others and have only heard it referred to as soda. I now live in the midwest and we also call it soda. The few people I know from New England have called it "pop".
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